VBS 2013 Development Diary: #8: Logo


This is a pretty graphic-heavy post.

When I first start working on a logo, I trial several fonts in Linotype FontExplorer, then I try them out  in Illustrator to see which ones I like best, looking for things like readability, tone, and flavor. This lets me see which fonts I might want:

001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

—as well as ones I absolutely don’t want—specifically fonts that have that cheezy, clichéd ‘rikki tikki’ Chinese feel to them:

002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once I have selected a few possibilities, I make a text box with the title in Adobe Illustrator and then copy it about a dozen times, then apply the different fonts to the text.

003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My first logo concept, like almost all first logo concepts, stunk. It looked like a very boring book:

Black Mantis1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Going back to the desk I decided on my favorite font: KingThings Conundrum. It looks amazing, just like it was drawn with a Chinese calligraphy brush.

005

 

 

 

 

However, it has a major problem: it’s not very readable. First I converted the font to outlines so that Illustrator sees it as a series of objects instead of type. My next step was to clean it up, getting rid of most of the ornaments:

006

007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here is the font all cleaned up. Notice something, however: the kerning. My friend Brenton taught me to use Illustrator. Back when I was first learning to use it, one of the first things he taught me was one of those tricks that separates the noobs from the pros–-kerning.

Kerning is the horizontal space between the letters. Notice how the spacing between the letters is uneven and crummy looking. The vertical space between the lines of letters called leading (pronounced LED-ing), is pretty bad too.

008

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now you can see the comparison between the cleaned up version and the original unkerned, unleaded, unreadable font.

009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have applied a stroke effect to the letters to look for any problems. Notice on the crook of the L part of the stroke has not applied, meaning I have a break in the shape of the letter.

010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I apply the stroke, I actually group the entire logo, copy it, and then past it behind, then apply the stroke to the behind-most copy. Below you can see how it looks when composited, next you can see the unstroked copy, and then the copy with the stroke applied.

011

There are still some tweaks to do. As you can see below, the default corner type looks kind of lame on certain points. You can adjust them to be sharper or more blunt, but in the end I just went with a rounded corner.

013014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I wanted to go with a gradient for this logo (I usually don’t) to give it more of an action/adventure feel. However, it still looks kind of flat, so I applied a thin, bright stroke to the front-most objects, which really made it pop out more:

015017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next I made a  drop shadow behind the logo by making a copy, pasting it behind the original, filling it with black, and shrinking it by ~2%.

018

 

 

 

 

 

 

I decided to bring back my kind of Chinese brushstroke mantis from my early design, to give kind kind of an ominous shadow to our heroic logo.

020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also wanted to incorporate some sword iconography, since it’s the story’s MacGuffin.

The mantis and the sword are just lines with a brush effect applied. You can see them below, as well as a box with a few more brush-effect lines added.

021

024

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here is the completed logo with bonus background (OK, so it’s not totally complete–the Chinese inside the green ribbons is just placeholder text):

final

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Comments are closed.